“Extraordinary” ginger-lime pickle

When I was a new student of Ayurveda, I constantly heard various teachers promoting the virtues of ginger-lime pickle as a natural aid to digestion.

— Ginger lime pickle WHAT? I thought to myself!

“What is it, and is it really as great as they say it is?”

In the end, I decided to find out the answers and made a ginger-lime pickle for the first time.

It soon became a staple that I keep in the fridge and use almost every day.

How to make ginger-lime pickle?

Ginger lime brine is made from crushed ginger, freshly squeezed lime juice and a pinch of mineral salt.

You can make it fresh or cook it for a couple of weeks and keep it in the fridge.

I like to make this ahead of time because the ginger softens when it sits in the salt and lime juice and tastes even better.

It tastes naturally spicy, like ginger. But there is an added tang of citrus and salt that adds a nice aftertaste to every bite.

Mineral Salt Note

According to Ayurveda, the best mineral salt is Himalayan pink salt.

The Epoch Times Photo
Pink salt is mined by hand from the ancient seabed deep under the Himalayan mountains in Pakistan and India. The source is plentiful. (Photo credit: Buttered Veg)

Unlike any other salt, Himalayan pink salt contains a small amount of sweet flavor (in addition to the salty flavor).

Pink salt also heats the body less than other salts and contains some light quality while other salts are completely heavy.

One last note: pink salt is rich in trace elements that you may not find anywhere else. Therefore, I highly recommend using it.

Digestive Benefits of Ginger-Lime Pickle

The reason for eating ginger before meals is to awaken your taste buds and get your digestive juices flowing.

This is a way to signal to your body that food is on its way.

Did you know that digestion and metabolism account for about 60 percent of your daily energy expenditure?

This means you put more effort into digestion than anything else.

It’s huge!

So it’s a good idea to help your body a little by using a ginger lime pickle.

Who Should Use Ginger Lime Pickle?

From an Ayurvedic perspective, ginger-lime pickle is good for all body types, especially Vata people who benefit from heat, salt, and sour taste.

Kapha types like it because it is stimulating and warming and also helps to clear congestion and congestion.

Pitta types are more likely to find it too stimulating if they eat too much.

However, ginger has a few special qualities that make it very suitable for Pitta’s fiery nature.

First, although ginger is quite pungent, its thermal energy is warm rather than hot.

The second main reason is that ginger has anti-inflammatory effects. Because inflammation is an Achilles’ heel for Pitta people, they actually benefit from it.

In fact, ginger has a crazy amount of healing properties in addition to the ones I have already mentioned.

8 health benefits of ginger

  1. Stimulates digestive juices
  2. Warm but not too warm
  3. Anti-inflammatory agent
  4. Burns ama, especially heaviness and congestion
  5. Opens blood vessels and revitalizes the blood
  6. Awakens taste buds and stimulates salivation.
  7. Relieves nausea and indigestion
  8. Hydration due to very high electrolyte content

4 Ways to Add Ginger-Lime Pickle to Your Diet

1. Eat a pinch before a meal, or any time you feel your digestion is sluggish and needs a boost. Eat as much or as little as you like.

If you don’t have a ready-made marinade, you can quickly cut off a slice of ginger, sprinkle it with salt and eat it.

2. Use prepared ginger-lime brine directly in cooking, as if you were adding ginger as an ingredient in a vegetable saute, soup, or stir-fry.

3. Add it to smoothies or warm milk.

4. Add a pinch to hot water and drink throughout the day, especially if you feel cold, weak, nauseous, or have other signs of ama.

The Epoch Times Photo
(Photo credit: Buttered Veg)

ginger lime pickle recipe

Course: garnish

Cuisine: Indian

Prep time: 6 minutes Servings: 24 servings

Ginger Lime Brine is a natural digestive aid made with crushed ginger, freshly squeezed lime juice and a pinch of mineral salt.

Ingredients
2-inch piece of ginger (about 3-4 tablespoons)
1 lime, juice
¼ teaspoon mineral salt

instructions
Grind the ginger by hand or in a mini grinder. To grind by hand, first peel the ginger.

Then chop the ginger as finely as possible. Stack the slices like a domino and finely cut into strips, then rotate the strips 90 degrees and finely cut into small square pieces.

Place the ginger in a small bowl, squeeze a fresh lime and add the salt. Mix well. The lime juice should be enough to just cover the ginger.

Transfer to a small glass jar for storage. It keeps in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks or more.

As ginger softens over time in salt and lime juice, it becomes even more delicious.

Notes
1. Eat a pinch before a meal, or any time you feel your digestion is sluggish and needs a boost. Eat as much or as little as you like. If you don’t have a ready-made marinade, you can quickly cut off a slice of ginger, sprinkle it with salt and eat it.
2. Use prepared ginger-lime brine directly in cooking, as if you were adding ginger as an ingredient in a vegetable saute, soup, or stir-fry.
3. Add it to smoothies.
4. Add a pinch to hot water and drink throughout the day, especially if you feel cold, weak, nauseous, or have other signs of ama.

Have you tried this recipe? Mention @buttered.veg or tag #bvjoyfulcooks!

This article was originally published on ButteredVeg.com.

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